Seminar prof. Robert Davison about “Developing Indigenous Theory” – November 24, 2017

ABRI and the KIN Research Group would like to invite you to a seminar given by prof. Robert Davison (City University of Hong Kong) about “Developing Indigenous Theory”.

The seminar will take place on Friday November 24 between 14:00 – 15:00 in room HG 11A-37.

To register for this event, please send an e-mail to Niki Konijn latest on Wednesday November 22, 2017.

 

Abstract: Theory plays a critical role in research, yet, I argue, is not always carefully applied. Theory is useful if it facilitates the systematic treatment of a topic and if it is also congruent with reality. When theories are developed they have boundary conditions, which delimit the extent to which they can be applied in contexts remote from those where they were developed. Context here may refer to geographical, cultural, social, professional or some other form of arrangement. Unfortunately, these boundary conditions are often ignored, with the result that theories are inappropriately applied. To resolve this issue, I suggest that we need to consider how we can build new theory that is contextually sensitive, that is relevant to indigenous contexts where it will be applicable. This is thus a call for appreciation of the particular rather than the general, of the local not the global.

Biography: Robert Davison is a Professor of Information Systems from the City University of Hong Kong. He is chair of the IFIP WG 9.4 (Social Implications of Computing in Developing Countries) and editor in chief of (i) the Information Systems Journal and (ii) the Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries. His research focuses on the use and misuse of information systems, especially in the knowledge management domain, in Chinese organisations. Much of his research involves qualitative data and an interpretive epistemology, with case studies and action research his preferred methods. Robert travels extensively, seeking to understand how people in different contexts and cultures make sense of their lives with IS. As a researcher and as an editor, he seeks to promote both an inclusive and a local perspective to research.